My Fellow Americans

I was inspired to make this flag based off of the life and tragic death of President John F Kennedy. I wanted to show a glimpse of what he had done for the United States, and the world, through this word art of the American flag. The flag is composed of John F Kennedy’s inaugural address. Here He spoke on issues of our planet, the hope that can come from everyone, and what we all need to do to make the world a better place. Then you can see the bullet holes and the dried blood on the flag. Here we have the two shots that ended an incredible man’s life, but not his legacy. With the placement of the bullet holes I sought to emphasize certain areas of His presidency that were affected, the first being the Cold War. The leftmost bullet hole is symbolizing how the freedom of all nations, not just Russia and the United States, were at stake in this delicate time. After that is the Civil Rights movement, and here we have the blood stains of the fight for rights, the fight for control, and the fight for the freedom of all of mankind. “And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.”

Best in Show of the 2015 Full Sail University "Life and Death" Hub Art Competition.
I was inspired to make this flag based off of the life and tragic death of President John F Kennedy. I wanted to show a glimpse of what he had done for the United States, and the world, through this word art of the American flag. The flag is composed of John F Kennedy’s inaugural address. Here He spoke on issues of our planet, the hope that can come from everyone, and what we all need to do to make the world a better place. Then you can see the bullet holes and the dried blood on the flag. Here we have the two shots that ended an incredible man’s life, but not his legacy. With the placement of the bullet holes I sought to emphasize certain areas of His presidency that were affected, the first being the Cold War. The leftmost bullet hole is symbolizing how the freedom of all nations, not just Russia and the United States, were at stake in this delicate time. After that is the Civil Rights movement, and here we have the blood stains of the fight for rights, the fight for control, and the fight for the freedom of all of mankind. “And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.”
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